Keeping you up to date with all the goings-on at TORCH

TORCH Newsletter Hilary Term

Weeks 1 & 2 (15th Jan – 28th Jan 2017)

Happy New Year all! We hope Hilary Term 2017 has got off to a wonderful start after a pleasant festive break.

Here at TORCH we are excited to be launching this year’s Annual Headline Series on Humanities & Identities with our launch event on 25th January 2017. The launch event will explore the question “What Does Diversity Mean to Me?” and we will be joined by a distinguished panel of experts from across the Humanities and the cultural and political sectors. As ever, all are welcome.

Below you’ll find news on recent TORCH community activities, details on upcoming events and information on current funding opportunities for research.

Highlighted Events

Humanities & Identities Launch Event: 'What does diversity mean to me?’

5.30pm-7.00pm, 25th January 2017

L1, Mathematical Institute, Woodstock Road, Oxford

We are excited to announce the public launch event in the TORCH Annual Headline Series 2017 will be ‘What does diversity mean to me?’  

Introduced by the Vice-Chancellor Professor Louise Richardson, this opening event will bring together a panel of experts from across the Humanities and the cultural and political sectors to discuss "What does diversity mean to me?". The panel will examine how diversity and inclusivity has shaped, and will continue to shape, the human experience and identity. We will be joined by Deborah Cameron (Rupert Murdoch Professor of Language and Communication), Ellah Allfrey (Author and literary critic), Maria Misra (Lecturer in Modern History), Jay Stewart (co-founder of ‘Gendered Intelligence’), Miles Hewstone (Professor in Social Psychology) and Marvin Rees (Mayor of Bristol). The discussion will be chaired by Elleke Boehmer (Professor of World Literature in English and TORCH Director).

There will be plenty of time for audience questions and discussion, which will be followed by a drinks reception from 7.00-7.30pm. Free and all welcome.

There will also be a free crèche available for parents and carers. Please email torch@humanities.ox.ac.uk to book a space.

Booking for the event is essential here.

All events are free and open to the public - we hope you can join us! 

Please click here for more information

News and Blogs

TORCH Critical Visualisation Network is Launched

Towards the end of 2016, the TORCH Critical Visualisation Network held its successful launch event 

In this new blog post, Network founder Ségolène Tarte talks about how the Network came to be and what influenced its development.

Click here to read more.

Law and Ethics in Never Let Me Go

In this Fiction and Human Rights Network Blog post, Jemima Paine writes about the Network's first lunchtime seminar of the academic year.

"The seminar centred on the acclaimed 2005 novel Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, the story of three clones whose predetermined destinies oblige them to have their organs harvested until three donations are secured and their lives thus ‘completed’. The presentations given on the novel and subsequent group discussion provoked an engaging debate surrounding the concept of ‘personhood’ as represented within literature and medical law."

You can read the post in full here.

Callaloo Early Career Workshop, November 2016

In this Voices Across Borders blog post, Imaobong Umoren (joint Pembroke-TORCH Career Development Fellow in Women in the Humanities and co-convenor of the workshop) writes on the second Race and Resistance/Callaloo postgraduate and early career workshop took place at The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities.

You can read the full blog post here.

Crisis, Extremes and Apocalypse network’s inaugural seminar

In this paper given during the ‘Crisis, Extremes and Apocalypse’ research network’s inaugural seminar, Professor Stephen Mulhall discusses "Philosophical Reading and the Ascetic Ideal-Nietzsche: Genealogy, Analogy, Logic."

Read the paper in full here.

New Opportunities

Andrew W. Mellon 'Humanities & Identities'

TORCH and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation are pleased to announce four exciting new research funding opportunities as part of the 'Humanities & Identities' Headline Series. Please check the website for further details on deadlines.

The 42 Bedford Row Disability Law Essay Prize 2017

The 42 Bedford Row Disability Law Essay Prize is the first academic writing award to be established by the Oxford Faculty of Law which focuses on legal issues affecting persons with a disability. It has been established to draw attention to the professional challenges faced by legal practitioners and academics who work in fields in which issues relating to disability frequently arise. Deadline noon on Friday 27th January 2017.

Job Opportunity: Georgian Group Caseworker for Southern England 

The Georgian Group is the national charity for the preservation of historic buildings and planned landscapes of c.1700‐1840 in England and Wales. We were established in 1937 and since 1971 have been a statutory consultee on Listed Building Consent applications.

They are seeking to appoint two full-time caseworkers to assess and respond to relevant development proposals in England. The Georgian Group has a statutory right to be notified where total or part demolition of any listed building dating from 1700-1840 in England is proposed. The Georgian Group is principally interested in buildings, landscapes and structures dating from 1700-1840. Deadline 12pm on 31 January 2017.

Great Transitions

The Oxford Martin School invites Expressions of Interest by 5pm on 28 February 2017 on researchable questions in the areas of:

  • Digital /AI Horizons - Normative Frontiers
  • Transition to the Post-Carbon Society
  • Zoonoses and Pandemics
  • African Futures

Stuart Hall Doctoral Studentship in association with Merton College and TORCH - 2017-2020

Applicants are sought for a DPhil studentship that is part of a collaboration between the Stuart Hall Foundation, Merton College and TORCH.

This opportunity is associated with the Stuart Hall Foundation, which is inspired by the life and work of Professor Stuart Hall. The Stuart Hall Foundation seeks to support new generations of creative thinkers to challenge the status quo and provoke original thinking, debate and research, illuminating connections between politics, culture and society. 

We welcome applications from candidates in any Faculty in the Humanities Division. Candidates with particular research interests in Professor Stuart Hall’s areas of expertise are encouraged, including cultural theory, criticism and reception; race, ethnicity, and identity; and the politics of diasporic experience. Applications must be received by the relevant January 2017 deadline appropriate to the Faculty.

Upcoming Events

Race and Nation in America from Obama to Trump

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 5:00pm

The Garden Room, Stanford House, 65 High Street, Oxford

The Long History of Identity, Ethnicity and Nationhood network invite you to this timely discussion with Professor Gary Gerstle (University of Cambridge). In this sweeping history of twentieth-century America Gerstle traces the forces of civic and racial nationalism, arguing that both profoundly shaped American society.

‘The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood Reconsidered’ Seminar aims at systematically rethinking the history and theory of ethnicity, nationhood and nationalism.

Please click here for more information

Book at Lunchtime: Literature and the Public Good

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 -12:30pm to 2:00pm

Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Road, Oxford

What is the public value of literary studies? What is the justification for literature at the present time? Literature and the Public Good looks at literature's value and its public presence, and its contribution to the public good.

The book's author, Professor Rick Rylance (Chief Executive, Arts and Humanities Research Council) will explore the issues raised with:

Jane Hiddleston (Professor of Literatures in French, University of Oxford)
Timothy Michael (Tutorial Fellow in English Literature, University of Oxford)
Ankhi Mukherjee (Professor of English and World Literatures, University of Oxford)

Helen Small (Professor of English Literature, University of Oxford)

Free and all welcome. Lunch will be available from 12.30, with discussion from 13.00-14.00.

Please register here.

Please click here for more information

The Celebrity Interview: History, Aesthetics, Method

Tuesday, January 17, 2017 -5:30pm to 7:00pm

Leonard Wolfson Auditorium, Wolfson College, Linton Rd, Oxford OX2 6UD

The second in a new series of Oxford Centre for Life-Writing events focusing on the intersections of life-writing and celebrity, this discussion panel is dedicated to the genre of the celebrity interview. Scholars and practitioners will cast a spotlight on one of the dominant forms in contemporary media and celebrity culture, exploring its history, aesthetics, and methodology. In her talk on “Interviews and the Work of Celebrity”, Rebecca Roach (King’s College London) will consider the labour involved in a format often derided as being little else but celebrity gossip, even though it has become the predominant mode of (self)promotion for authors and other public figures. Anneleen Masschelein (University of Leuven, Belgium) examines the practice of the recorded last interview by eminent intellectuals, such as Dennis Potter, Edward Said, and Stuart Hall. Her contribution looks at this media phenomenon in the light of the ‘famous last words’ tradition and against the background of a shift in practices of dying in contemporary Western culture.

The panel will be rounded off by a ‘meta interview’: a conversation between critic and biographer Hermione Lee and arts journalist and broadcaster Mark Lawson about the art and method of the celebrity interview.

The event is free and open to all.

Please click here for more information

How and why have Oxford Admissions outcomes reproduced existing inequalities?

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 -12:00pm to 2:00pm

Seminar Room 2 / Kloppenberg Room, Exeter College, Oxford

Sol Gamsu (University of Bath) and Claire Maxwell (UCL/Institute of Education)

Will lead a roundtable discussion exploring the question: How and why have Oxford Admissions outcomes reproduced existing inequalities?

This event is intended to promote discussion of the historical, geographical and social forces shaping admissions to Oxford in the past and which still have an influence today. The speakers' research draws on geography, history, sociology, and education to illuminate long-standing trends and influences. We hope that discussing and gaining a better understanding of these patterns may help admissions tutors, access officers, interviewers, and others involved in Oxford admissions to build on the work already being done by outreach officers and schemes like UNIQ to recruit students more widely.

Free lunch prepared by @Tastetibet

All welcome – please register via eventbrite - https://ragstoriches-oxfordadmissions.eventbrite.co.uk

This event is part of the Rags to Riches?: Experiences of Social Mobility since 1800 network.

Please click here for more information

Looking back on 2015-16

As we move swiftly through the new academic year, we look back at some of our highlights from 2015-16. 

FRIGHTFriday: Goth Horror: Medicine and Monsters

Take a look at one of the highlights from FRIGHTFriday held in November 2016 at the Ashmolean Museum. In this bitesize talk, Dr Andrew Papanikitas (University of Oxford) talks to us about Gothic Horror: Medicine and Monsters. 

Watch here

#NeverHillary vs #NeverTrump: The US Election on Social Media Panel Discussion

In this panel discussion Professor Philip Howard (Oxford Internet Institute), Gemma Joyce (Brandwatch), and Matthew Lee Anderson (Mere Orthodoxy) discuss the 2016 US election on social media. Moderated by Yin Yin Lu.

Listen here

Events Calendar, Weeks 8-10

Monday 16 January

14:00 | BOOKS FOR THE MEDIEVAL CLASSROOM

Part of the Palaeography and Manuscript Studies seminar series

17:00 | DIDEROT AND D’HOLBACH ON CAUSAL NECESSITATION

Part of the Besterman Enlightenment workshop series

 

Tuesday 17 January

11:30 – 13:00 | READING GROUP

Centre for Gender, Identity, and Subjectivity

17:00 | A FORUM FOR REASON: SOUTH AFRICA'S CONSTITUTIONAL COURT

Speaker: Kate O'Regan (University of Oxford)

17:30 – 19:00 | THE CELEBRITY INTERVIEW: HISTORY, AESTHETICS, METHOD

Event focusing on intersections of life-writing and celebrity

 

Wednesday 18 January

13:00 – 14:00 | SKILLED GHANAIAN RETURN MIGRANTS NAVIGATING THE GENDERED POLITICS OF ‘ADJUSTMENT’

Part of the International Migration Institute Seminar Series

17:00 | THE MATERIAL PRESENCE OF ABSENT ANTIQUITIES

With Caroline van Eck (Cambridge University)

17:00 | RACE AND NATION IN AMERICA FROM OBAMA TO TRUMP

Speaker: Gary Gerstle (University of Cambridge)

17:00 – 19:00 | JON STALLWORTHY POETRY PRIZE 2017: AWARD CEREMONY

Hosted by Wolfson College and the University of Oxford English Faculty

 

Thursday 19 January

14:00 – 15:30 | RUSSIAN HOMOPHOBIA FROM STALIN TO SOCHI: HISTORIES AND CONTEXTS

Part of the Feminist Mappin in a Volatile World: Spaces of Creativity and Survival series

17:00 | UNDERSTANDING ZIMBABWE: FROM LIBERATION TO AUTHORITARIANISM

Speaker: Sara Dorman (University of Edinburgh)

17:15 | LAYDEEZ DO COMICS

With Sarah Lightman

 

Friday 20 January

9:00 – 17:00 | LAW AND LEGALISM IN TIBET

Event organised by Professor Fernanda Pirie (Centre for Socio-Legal Studies)

9:30 – 11:00 | HEIDEGGER READING GROUP

Graduate led reading group

12:45 – 14:00 | STEERING GROUP MEETING

TORCH Race and Resistance programme

17:00 | ON MADNESS AND EXPERTISE: THE ATOMIC BOMB AND VISIONS OF GLOBAL ORDER IN THE 1940S’

Speaker: Dr Or Rosenboim (University of Cambridge)

17:00 19:00 | HE SYRIAC LIFE OF MAR AWGEN: PORTRAYING A MONASTIC HOLY MAN IN LATE ANTIQUE MESOPOTAMIA

Part of the Cult of Saints in the First Millennium project

 

Saturday 21 January

9:00 – 17:00 | LAW AND LEGALISM IN TIBET

Event organised by Professor Fernanda Pirie (Centre for Socio-Legal Studies)

  

Monday 23 January

12:45 – 14:00 | OCCT DISCUSSION GROUP: WHAT IS GOOD LITERATURE?

An Experiment in Aesthetic Judgement & Implicit Comparison

17:00 | THE SCORPION’S LASH

Gender and the Making of an Imperial Anthropocene in Victorian Afghanistan

17:00 | PRINCE EUGENE OF SAVOY AND THE RADICAL ENLIGHTENMENT: A REAPPRAISAL

Part of the Besterman Enlightenment workshop series

14:00 | CRISES IN SCIENCE AND A CRISIS FOR SCIENCE

Speaker: Professor Alexander Bird (University of Bristol) 

 

Tuesday 24 January

11:00 – 15:30 | GLOBAL AND COMPARATIVE FEMINISMS IN THE LONG NINETEENTH CENTURY

Organised by Professor Kathryn Gleadle and Professor Marilyn Booth (University of Oxford)

13:00 – 14:00 | SOCIAL MEDIA: THE RISKS, THE OPPORTUNITIES AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR YOU AND ME

A Research Uncovered talk at the Centre for Digital Scholarship

17:00 | ANOTHER COUNTRY: EVERYDAY SOCIAL RESTITUTION IN SOUTH AFRICA

Speaker: Sharlene Swartz (Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria)

17:30 – 19:00 | HOW TO WRITE A WORLD LIFE

Speaker: Patrick French

 

Wednesday 25 January

12:00 – 14:00 | HOW AND WHY HAVE OXFORD ADMISSIONS OUTCOMES REPRODUCED EXISTING INEQUALITIES?

A roundtable discussion for the 'Rags to Riches? Experiences of social mobility since 1800' network

12:30 – 14:00 | LITERATURE AND THE PUBLIC GOOD

Book at Lunchtime session 

13:00 – 14:00 | MIGRATORY FLOWS, COLONIAL ENCOUNTERS AND THE HISTORIES OF TRANSATLANTIC SLAVERY

Part of the International Migration Institute Seminar Series

14:00 – 15:30 | THE RELATION OF LITERATURE AND LEARNING TO SOCIAL HIERARCHY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

With papers by Neil Kenny and Ceri Sullivan

17:00 | THE MATERIAL PRESENCE OF ABSENT ANTIQUITIES

With Caroline van Eck (Cambridge University)

17:15 – 18:45 | GENDER AND AUTHORITY SEMINAR

Speakers: Jennifer Griffiths (American University of Rome) and Yasmin Khan (University of Oxford)

17:30 – 19:30 | HEADLINE SERIES 2017

Launch Event: ‘What does diversity mean to me?’

 

Thursday 26 January

14:00 – 15:30 | GENDERED AND SEXUALIZED GUANXI: THE USE OF EROTIC CAPITAL IN THE WORKPLACE IN URBAN CHINA

Part of the Feminist Mappin in a Volatile World: Spaces of Creativity and Survival series

17:00 | "CLEAN MY CHINESE WIFE": INTIMACY AND IDENTITY POLITICS OF NIGERIAN MIGRANTS IN SOUTHERN CHINA

Speaker: Yu Qiu (University of Cambridge)

 

Friday 27 January

09:00 – 17:00 | MYSTICISM AS HEALING

Medieval and Early Modern Contributions for a Religious History of Healing and Care

09:30 – 11:00 | HEIDEGGER READING GROUP

Graduate led reading group

12:30 – 13:45 | EDWIDGE DANTICAT: CREATING DANGEROUSLY

Co-hosted by TORCH Fiction and Human Rights network and Race and Resistance programme

19:00 - 22:30 | LINGUAMANIA

Live! Friday at the Ashmolean Museum

 

Friday 27 January – Saturday 28 January

IN SEARCH OF THE GOLDEN FLEECE

Linguistic and Cultural Interactions between Greece and the Ancient Near East

 

Saturday 28 January

09:00 | LANGUAGES & CREATIVITY

Creative Multilingualism conference

 

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Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

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